Holes

There is no lake at Camp Green Lake.

It’s like a Mad Max fairy tale. Mostly because of the location being the desert and the adults being cruel, dubiously acting monsters, not so much for the end of the world/post-apocalyptic part.

Stanley (‘Caveman’) is sent to Camp Green Lake so he doesn’t has to go to juvenile jail. There’s no green or lake at the camp, Stanley’s innocent and the only thing the teenagers do all they is dig holes. To build character, it is said.

Of course that’s not all there is to it. Stanley’s story is entwined with the story of Green Lake, giving a magic realistic feel to the story of a lost boy. There is definitely something very wrong with (almost) all the adults, giving the novel a tender us-against-the-world feeling.

Louis Sachar makes the desert sand almost heat up the pages, showing an unfriendly world with surprising allies.

Holes, Louis Sachar, Douglas & McIntyre Ltd. 1998

Advertisements

The Ocean at the End of the Lane

It was only a duck pond, out at the back of the farm.

I have always been a fan of Neil Gaiman. I feel like his Neverwhere was my first experience with the contemporary fantasy genre. So of course I had my eyes peeled for his latest.

At first I had to get used to the world and the story a little. It starts with a (seemingly) plain grown man, in a normal situation. When the flashbacks start, and his neighbors are introduced, is when the fantasy braids itself into every plot line. It turns into more organic, softer, flowing than I’m used to with Gaiman’s work. The world created is terrifying and beautiful and painted in otherworldly colors.

And in the center of all that it’s just a story about just a young boy that tries to grow up. Because that’s something Gaiman does nicely as well.

The Ocean at the End of the Lane, Neil Gaiman, Harper Collings 2013

Child 44

Since Maria had decided to die, her cat would have to fend for itself.

I was too late to watch the movie. I think I made the right decision reading the book (first).

No-one in the Soviet is safe from the system, not even those enforcing it. It all starts with the murder of a child. But murder is a crime, and crimes only happen in capitalist societies, so the protagonist has to deny it happening, naming it an accident to make it easier and safer for everyone. Of course that safety doesn’t last long.

How do you prove a crime if every authority wants it not to be one? Main character Leo and his wife quickly discover that it’s a brutal path, the communist society being another player in this detective story. The story itself is fiction, but every insane government rule or fear mongering is bizarre enough to be believed by the rule of truth being stranger than fiction.

For those interested in the Soviet and okay with pretty visual violence imagery, definitely a recommendation.

Child 44,  Tom Rob Smith, Simon & Schuster 2008

Ex Machina

110 min.

“Is dat niet gewoon weer zo’n Ghost in the Shell, moeten we bang zijn voor AI, de robots komen ons vernietigen film?” Misschien wel, misschien een beetje, maar op deze manier kun je elke film wel terug brengen naar één bekend cliché. Ex Machina is vooral een doolhof, iets dat onder de huid kruipt. Mét kunstmatige intelligentie aanwezig.

DNA Films 2015
DNA Films 2015

Een kantoormus wint een bedrijfsloterij waardoor hij op bezoek mag bij het genie aan de top, een vreemde vogel die in een supermodern huis in de middle of nowhere woont. Nadat hij een geheimhoudingsverklaring ondertekent, mag hij dan Ava ontmoeten. Ava, kunstmatige intelligentie in een mooi vormpje, moet de Turing test ondergaan. Maar is intelligentie wel genoeg om te overleven?

Ex Machina biedt sprookjeachtige (de Grimm soort, niet de Disney soort) inzichten en verhaallijnen, maar haalt tegelijkertijd iets post-apocalyptisch en filosofisch aan. Combineer dit met een vibrerende soundtrack en er is tussen al het Marvel geweld door toch nog een reden om naar de bioscoop te gaan.

Ex Machina, DNA Films 2015

A Boy’s Guide to Track and Field

Lem woke with a sudden snort.

Ik wist niet wat te verwachten en werd toch teleurgesteld. Nou ja, zelfs teleurstelling is een te groot woord. Het begon interessant en frustrerend, maar verwaterde snel naar een loshangend iets dat alleen bij elkaar werd gehouden omdat het dezelfde karakters bevat.

De 25-jarige Lem zit weer thuis bij zijn moeder en stiefvader. Hij is niet blij met zijn baan, zijn vrienden, zijn liefdesleven .. hij is niet blij. Maar wel op een passieve manier.
Er is een flinke hoeveelheid navelstaarderij tussen terugblikken en conversaties waar Lem altijd te laat aan deelneemt. Het eerste eenderde deel gunt nog een blik in het mannenbrein maar daarna ..komt de lezer terecht in de aantekeningen van de auteur.

Misschien ben ik gewoon niet de lezer voor navelstaarderij en uitzichtloosheid.

A Boy’s Guide To Track And Field, Sabrina Broadbent, Chatto & Windus 2006

Lionel Asbo

Dear Jennaveieve,
I’m having an affair with an older woman.

I gave Martin Amis another chance. It started out like I had judged him wrong for The Pregnant Widow, but suddenly, in the last 50 – 60 pages it became a struggle again. Point of views swam and swapped without any tether or support, plot lines were deserted. And I was back being frustrated again.

Lionel Asbo is a walking ASBO (anti-social behavior order), viewed through the eyes of his cousin. They live in the trash can, society’s drain of London, surrounded by violence, disturbed families and a big need to fit in with the desperate ways. Things change, yet stay the same when Lionel wins a huge lottery prize. Millions.

Combine this with the story teller trying to break free from his surroundings, family matters, financial matters, violence and a love for the comfort of prison and you have something boiling. Sadly, by the end of the book, boiling over.

Lionel Asbo: State of England, Martin Amis, Cape 2012