Brave New World

A squat grey building of only thirty-four stories.

One for my Why Are They Called Classics And Are They Worthy Of The Name list. I read 1984 quite a while ago and thought that would do when it came to covering books from the (distant) past about the (distant) future. But as always it was my library that changed things; Brave New World (with the added Brave New World Revisited) was in plain view and here we are. I liked the story telling, the story scared and disgusted me. Which is -I hope- not new to anyone who reads it.

In Brave New World we see life in the 26th century on planet Earth. There is no such thing as love, families or traditional education; it has been replaced by reproductive technology and sleep-learning. Society is divided into different castes: Alphas on top (bred most successfully), Epsilons at the bottom (little more than factory workers with no identity to speak of). This world is introduced to us through the eyes of Bernard Marx, an Alpha but a stunted one. Because of this he feels an outsider, but he realizes what being a real outsider is when he takes home a Savage and his mother.
Because not every place on planet Earth has been civilized like the western world. No, there are small spaces, reserves, where the savages live. Humans who still believe in gods, monogamy and family. Of course the “civilized world” is blown away by this Savage (he quickly loses his name). So is the Savage by “civilization”, but not in the way the people expected it.

The ugly thing about this story is that a lot of it is believable. Ideas that are possible to grow in people’s minds. What if we make humans only loyal to capitalism and consumerism and nothing else? What if we take away all flaws and dump the humans when they’re not “necessary” anymore?  I’m not saying that I expect Brave New World to be reality by the end of this century, but I do believe that there are people out there thinking it. The people that don’t think about it and will fight for the right of being an individual just need to stay the majority.

I think Brave New World is worth of the title Classic.

Brave New World, Aldous Huxley, HarperCollins 1932

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